Weekly Food Response:

                This week has been pretty hectic for me. Usually when I’m running around for hours on end I don’t pay attention to what I eat and this week has been no different. Even though the week doesn’t show any signs of slowing down I want to start to pay attention to what I’m eating again instead of just sitting down and shoveling food in my mouth. I haven’t really been paying attention to the portion sizes of my food or the times I’ve been eating which is strange for me. Since spring break I started something new with my diet and I’ve been trying to only eat between the hours of 10am-6pm and cut out my late night snacking. Since I’ve been doing this I feel a lot healthier especially when I wake up in the morning. For years my diet has consisted of eating really late at night and whatever I could find. At first this transition was hard for me because I would get hungry around 8pm but I realized it was only because that was when I technically wouldn’t “allow” myself to eat, so it was all in my head. I want to try and abide by this because it makes me feel good and healthier than I’ve been in the past. However, I’ll be cheating tonight and going to Rita’s later tonight for free water ice to celebrate the first day of Spring 😛 This week my mom and I also started to think about what we will cook for Easter dinner in a few weeks and came to the conclusion that we should try and cook some healthier alternatives to what we have had in the past.

Weekly Response:

“Dietary Supplements: A round-up of bad news” was at the top of Marion Nestle’s Food Politics blog this week. It caught my eye similarly to the blog she had about pomegranate juice a few months ago. Like the pomegranate juice, dietary supplements are something that women in my family have sworn by for years now. There is a big store in the center of my town at home that sells every type of supplement available. I was shocked and how long this blog was and how many negative reports there were. Recent reports have stated that some supplements do more harm than good, some companies don’t report problems to the FDA, and some companies can’t back up health claims. 
“Last year, the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued two reports examining health claims on immune support and weight loss supplements, both fast-growing segments of the industry. In its first report, Structure/Function Claims Fail To Meet Federal Requirements, the OIG points to FDA’s limited enforcement authority over such claims. As a result, supplement companies cut corners and ignore requirements for such claims”
This surprised me a lot because I do take some supplements but now I’m curious to find out whether or not they’re doing what they came that they are. This is something that I want to share with my supplement-crazy family.

Weekly Food Response:

Over break I felt like I was able to eat extremely healthy. I was pretty much eating food that is grown and not processed. My family eats a lot of salad for meals. Every night we had a salad with some type of meat on the side. That was a little strange for me because I’ve been avoiding meat for most of the semester. My mom and I also went on a shopping spree in the Harry and David and bought a lot of food that might not necessarily be the healthiest. However, I’ve been attempting to stick to portion sizes provided on the foods that I eat so I didn’t feel too guilty about the shopping spree. I’m excited to be back for the remainder of the semester with a fridge fully stocked from Wegmans. I made it a point to go food shopping there before I came back to school and successfully avoided most of the unhealthy foods. I was also able to pick up some organic shampoo and conditioner for my hair. I was in the isle of organic products for so long trying to figure out what everything was and which products to buy. I remembered talking about the true meaning of “organic” in class and it made me want to start using products like that. I was surprised at how expensive everything was and it made me think about how before in class I said that I would not be willing to sacrifice more money to get a better and healthier product. I contradicted myself when I bought the shampoo and conditioner but surprisingly, I think it is something that I’m going to continue doing. 

Weekly Response:

                “Daily News Op-Ed: Bloomberg’s soda ‘ban’ should be only the beginning” was the blog that caught most of my attention on Food Politics this week. To sum up this article, “Mayor Bloomberg’s 16-ounce cap on sugary sodas goes into effect on Tuesday, March 12. After that, restaurants, movie theaters, sports venues and food carts will not be permitted to sell extra-large portions of sugar-packed drinks.” In my opinion this soda “ban” is a step in the right direction. Americans are constantly complaining about how being overweight has become natural in our society. It’s because of gigantic portion sizes that other countries in the world could not even imagine that being overweight is the norm. I know a lot of people that can’t stand wasting food. I feel like when people are pressured to order larger sizes in places like movie theaters and sports venues; those types of “anti-food wasting” Americans feel forced to finish the huge soda that they just bought. By doing this they are taking in so many unnecessary calories that they don’t need and would not be ingesting if they just stuck to ordering a small drink or popcorn. I was shocked when I read that the original Coca-Cola was only 6.5 ounces. That is so much smaller than any soda we can imagine drinking now in 2013. I don’t think it would be a damaging thing to our country to be able to get back around to offering drinks that are that small. Yes, they are cheaper and would not bring in as much money, but if we want to be the healthy America that seems like has been placed on the back burner then sacrifices should be made.