Weekly Response:

On January 17, 2013 Marion Nestle posted on his blog “Food Politics.” I was very interested in the article, “The FTC says no to POM Wonderful’s health claims.” I was interested because for years there has always been a large bottle of POM juice sitting right in the center of my fridge at home. All this time I’ve listened to my family and friends swear by POM juice. Some have even been naïve enough to say that it alone is the key to a long and healthy life. POM juice has claimed in the past that it can help with heart disease, prostate cancer, erectile dysfunction, and other issues concerning health. However, all juices have antioxidants in them that can make a person healthier. I’m sure there are a lot of American’s very disappointed by the fact that this juice doesn’t offer anything more than other regular fruit juices. The difference is that not all juices claim that they can essentially cheat death. I’m glad people are starting to realize that it’s just another company attempting to make more money by taking advantage of people aiming to be healthier. It’s not fair to those trying to live a healthy lifestyle are being deceived by large companies. However, people should also not be so quick to grab the first thing off the shelf that their grocery store that they believe will help them live longer.

Weekly Food Log:

 This week I noticed that I’ve been eating breakfast more often usual. I’ve started to make it a point to get up a little earlier and grab something to eat before I head to class. It’s been drilled in my head since I was in elementary school that you should always eat breakfast. “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day,” is something that I would always hear but never really listened to. Focusing on making sure I eat two substantial meals a day has been one of my goals when I started the new semester. I thought it would help me keep a good schedule and keep my days organized around meal times. So far I would say it has worked pretty well except for some days that have been extremely busy. Since we started class on the 14th I’ve been trying to be healthier especially because of our discussions in class. I’ve been eating salad for dinner most of the time because at times it’s the only “good” food offered at the caf. Sociology of Food has made me realize that most of the food I think is healthy actually isn’t. So many of the fruits and vegetables I eat aren’t as good as I think. Especially in the winter months, most of the vegetables in my “healthy” salad aren’t grown this time of year and are shipped from all over the world. It’s nearly impossible to trace where the food we eat comes from and that’s disappointing.

Weekly Response:

            The blog “Food Politics” by Marion Nestle caught my eye quite quickly. The blog post, “Coca-Cola fights obesity? Oh, please” was one in particular that I thought was interesting. In the past year I’ve made an effort to cut soda out of my diet completely and slowly transition to drinking mostly water. Because of this healthier choice this blog gained my attention as I was skimming different blog websites. This blog focused on Coca-Cola’s new video add. This video is two minutes long. The blog states, “[this video] argues that the company is producing lower-calorie products in smaller sizes and promoting community activity, that all calories count, and that it’s up to you to fit Coke into your healthy active lifestyle.” I couldn’t agree more with Marion Nestle in the fact that there if Coke actually wanted to end obesity in America there are so many more practical things they could be doing. Some of these included, stopping the marketing that targets young children, and stop fighting the push toward removing vending machines from schools. I thought the vending machine topic was important. This was because when I was a senior in high school around 2010 I remember when my school slowly started to remove vending machines or replace the soda in them with “healthier” alternatives. There was an uproar from groups of students thinking that it was ridiculous. Learning that the Coca-Cola company has been fighting these attempts when they claim to want to “end obesity” is extremely hypocritical. 

Weekly Food Log:

Being enrolled in Sociology of Food has already started to change my ideas about the food I eat. I’ve began to question where my food comes from and what food I’m actually eating. While reading chapter four of Omnivore’s Dilemma I started to realize how much is in the food I eat that I never realized before. Michael Pollan writes, “Then there’s a deep pile of manure on which I stand, in which 534 sleeps. We don’t know much about the hormones in it—where they will end up, or what they might do once they get there—but we do know something about the bacteria, which can find their way from the manure on the ground to his hide and from there into our hamburgers” (81). Just reading this paragraph made me think about the amount of meat I consume, especially hamburgers. I was surprised at myself for not wondering what is in my food before this point. It’s as if most Americans have become accustomed to eating what’s put in front of them and not to question it. I know that I eat a lot of chicken in addition to meat and I’m a little nervous to find out the facts about where it comes from and what is actually in it. As “grossed” out as I feel about some of the food I eat I’m glad I can become educated about it and maybe begin a healthier lifestyle just by becoming curious about what I’m ingesting on a daily basis.